Pets

Book early!

"Summer is a very busy time for grooming. Please plan well ahead to avoid dissapointment."

Grooming

Our head nurse Sam Sharma is in charge of all Grooming activities at Seaforth Vets.

Sam grooms both cats and dogs.

 When you drop off your dog or cat, a member of staff will discuss the specifications with you, as we do not want to disappoint! For example desired coat length, purpose of the groom etc.

Cat grooms are carried out by all nursing staff on a Friday."

Dog grooming is generally carried out on Thursdays each week. 

As Sam runs a very busy grooming service and there is often a waiting list, (especially during summer when clip downs are in big demand during tick season!) don't delay in getting in touch with her well in advance of your grooming dates to avoid disappointment.

Please note that we cannot groom heavy coated dogs such as Alaskan Malamutes, as they require industrial strenght clippers. Such grooms are carried out by Pittwater Animal Hospital.

Drop off: 8.30-10.30am. Reception will allot a specific time for you. Please turn up at the allotted time as mornings can be hectic with hospital admissions. Allow 5 min for a discussion with the groomer.

Pick Up: Can be a bone of contention! Please remember we are a veterinary hospital, as such ill animals come first! Surgery takes priority above grooms. You expect no less if it was your pet in for a surgical procedure. As such we cannot guarantee a pick up time before 4pm. However we will do our best to accommodate your requirements.


Our Reception staff is always happy to check Sam's availability for you.

 

And now for a few general comments....

Grooming your Pet

Cats and dogs need daily brushing to keep their coats clean and tidy. Animals who are groomed feel better in themselves because it stimulates the circulation and removes debris and loose hair. Done regularly your pet will get used to you and your groomer touching them. If done only when the hair is matted and knotted grooming can become a struggle. Almost all the time you'll need to clip close the skin to remove the knots. If you plan to get a long haired pet, either a dog or a cat then start grooming as early as possible. It's best to get into a routine that suits you and your pet. Use a good brush or comb eg. slicker brush. Remember to brush in between the legs, tummy and behind the ears as this seems the most common places for knots.

Tips for Shampooing Your Pet

  • Thoroughly wet your dog all over, the more water you get into the coat the easier it is to shampoo.
  • Use a sponge to apply shampoo around the face, carefully avoiding the eyes.
  • When lathering up always add more water before you add more shampoo. A shampoo won't lather well in the absence of water.
  • Rub the shampoo all over including around the muzzle, lips and under the tail. These are the areas bacteria and fungus spread from and are common causes of infection.
  • Rinse thoroughly, if take time to get rid of all the shampoo from the coat - about 5 minutes in long haired dogs.
  • Dry GENTLY as using heat or vigorous towel drying will irritate the skin.

 

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